Thread: SSA Session: Seismic Structure of Convergent Plate Margins

Started: 2018-01-09 00:10:49
Last activity: 2018-01-09 00:10:49
Topics: SSA Meetings
Dear colleagues,



We invite you to submit an abstract to the technical session “Seismic
Structure of Convergent Plate Margins” at the Seismology of the Americas
SSA-LACSC joint meeting to take place in Miama, FL from May 14-17 (
https://seismology2018.org/).



We hope this session will contribute to our collective understanding of how
subduction-related processes are reflected in the seismic character of the
convergent margin in which they occur at both regional and local scales.


Abstract Deadline is January 24, 2018. Submit here: https://www.seismosoc.
org/meetings/abstract-submissions/


Also, don't forget to apply for a travel grant if you are a graduate
student or early career researcher!

https://seismology2018.org/travel-grants/



Min Chen (Michigan State University)

Jonathan R. Delph (Rice University)
________________________________________________

Seismic Structure of Convergent Plate Margins

Convergence between tectonic plates is accomodated in multiple ways,
including subduction, large-scale transform motion and continent-continent
collision. This convergence is manifested through the creation of volcanic
arcs, orogenic plateau formation and high seismicity rates. As a result,
lithospheric-scale reworking of the converging plates is common in these
systems.

The tectonics of convergent plate margins have been well studied. However,
how convergence is manifested in the seismic structure of these regions is
still debated due to the complexity of the regions and differences in
datasets and methodology. This session aims to shed light on how the
processes that accompany convergence are expressed in the lithospheric
structure of the crust and upper mantle of these margins, in the context of
the increased availability and coverage of seismic data and recent advances
in seismic tomography and imaging techniques. Examples of convergent plate
boundary systems include but are not limited to: the Mediterranean,
Alpine-Himalayan, American Cordillera, Caribbean and western Pacific
systems.

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