Thread: Deciphering Active Tectonics and Seismic Hazard in Eastern North America - technical session @ NE/SE GSA 2020

Started: 2019-12-01 13:07:05
Last activity: 2019-12-01 13:07:05
Greetings Tectonics and Seismic Hazard Enthusiast,

We would like to draw your attention to the Theme Session (T26) entitled “
Deciphering Active Tectonics and Seismic Hazard in Eastern North America”
at the 2020 NE/SE Joint Section Meeting in Reston, Virginia, March 20-22 (
https://www.geosociety.org/GSA/Events/Section_Meetings/GSA/Sections/se/2020mtg/home.aspx
https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.geosociety.org%2FGSA%2FEvents%2FSection_Meetings%2FGSA%2FSections%2Fse%2F2020mtg%2Fhome.aspx&data=02%7C01%7CLisaS%40dnfsb.gov%7C8b9180b75f7e4372b95f08d76879bfdd%7Cafbea80573f9432abb436212d02d7b93%7C1%7C0%7C637092744439107334&sdata=h1YbqjzLzo49lwcHZ7o%2FJ4xZ8hdmNXI5efK9oMAXQw4%3D&reserved=0
).
[image: image.png]

The processes leading to intraplate earthquakes and zones of historical
seismicity in eastern North America are poorly understood because
earthquake rates are relatively low, surface expression can be subtle to
non-existent, and active faults can be hidden beneath the surface or
episodic in behavior. Yet the region has major population centers in
moderate to high seismic hazard regions with infrastructure that was not
built to withstand significant earthquakes. Events such as the 2011
Virginia earthquake, data from EarthScope and GeoPRISMS, paleoseismic
studies, and modeling may provide evidence for neotectonic earthquakes and
their driving mechanisms in relation to crustal structure. New results from
EarthScope Flexible Array experiments in the region are revealing the
presence of large velocity anomalies in the upper mantle that may be linked
to earthquake occurrence.

This session will bring together researchers with interests in
understanding seismic hazard in eastern North America, including studies of
Quaternary tectonics, lithospheric structure, seismic hazard analysis, and
site response. We welcome contributions in any geoscience discipline,
including but not limited to seismology, structural geology and tectonics,
geomorphology, geodynamics, paleoseismology, geochronology, geophysical
imaging, and numerical modeling, that contribute new evidence for
earthquakes, refine or improve existing earthquake histories, evaluate the
potential for reactivation of ancient faults, provide new models explaining
earthquake causal mechanisms, or refine or improve our understanding of
earthquake hazard.

Abstract submission deadline is December 10, 2019. Abstracts can be
submitted at https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2020SE/cfp.cgi
https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgsa.confex.com%2Fgsa%2F2020SE%2Fcfp.cgi&data=02%7C01%7CLisaS%40dnfsb.gov%7C8b9180b75f7e4372b95f08d76879bfdd%7Cafbea80573f9432abb436212d02d7b93%7C1%7C0%7C637092744439117286&sdata=RNXWKn%2FmQxxFxYBB0mkQk%2BmloZVo9WDSs4gR8Mv9c7w%3D&reserved=0
.

Please see the flyer for this event here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-AKD0qQhOmk8_QALi9Acyb2kotMaTRzS/view?usp=sharingand
do not hesitate to contact one of us if you have any questions. Also, please
pass this invitation on to others who might be interested in submitting an
abstract.



All the Best,

Lisa, Wright, Chris, and Chris



Lisa S. Schleicher

Independent Researcher (lisaschleicher.org)

Tel: 202-694-7014

Email: lisasschleicher<at>gmail.com


J. Wright Horton, Jr.

U.S. Geological Survey

926A National Center, Reston, VA 20192 USA

Tel: 703-648-6933

Email: whorton<at>usgs.gov

Chris Cramer

Center for Earthquake Research and Information, University of Memphis

3890 Central Avenue, Memphis, TN 38152 USA

Tel: 901-678-4992

Email: ccramer<at>memphis.edu



Christine A. Powell

Center for Earthquake Research and Information, University of Memphis

3890 Central Avenue, Memphis, TN 38152 USA

Tel: 901-678-8455

Email: capowell<at>memphis.edu

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