Thread: AGU S001 session on the mechanics behind aseismic transient slip events

Started: 2020-07-09 10:51:18
Last activity: 2020-07-27 16:09:34
Topics: AGU Meetings
Dear colleagues and friends,

Please consider submitting an abstract to our session "S001 - Advances
in understanding the mechanics behind aseismic transient slip events" at
the 2020 AGU Fall meeting.

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm20/prelim.cgi/Session/101972

Slow, aseismic slip provides insight into areas of faults where
frictional properties are conditionally stable. Yet our current
understanding of the mechanics of slow slip transients cannot explain
either their broad diversity, both temporal and spatial, or their
implications for earthquake hazards. Complex interactions with tectonic
tremor, regular earthquakes, or earthquake swarms are often observed,
suggesting a direct, but still unclear connection between aseismic and
seismic slip. Indirect evidence hints that high pore fluid pressures
affect some slow slip events. While slow slip signals were observed
before some large earthquakes, a better understanding of the mechanics
behind aseismic transient slip events could reveal possible forecasting
applications.

This session welcomes: studies of aseismic transient slip observations,
including interactions between aseismic and seismic slip behavior;
studies of the mechanical properties or physics of aseismic transient
slip, including modeling and laboratory work; and studies relating
transient slip processes to seismic hazards.

The abstract submission is open until Wednesday, 29 July 2020, 11:59
p.m., ET.

Sincerely,



Lucile Bruhat (Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris)

Kathryn Materna (USGS Earthquake Science Center)

Noel Bartlow (University of California Berkeley)

  • Dear all,

    The deadline for submitting your AGU abstract is coming up fast! Please
    consider submitting an abstract to our session "S001 - Advances in
    understanding the mechanics behind aseismic transient slip events
    (https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm20/prelim.cgi/Session/101972) at the 2020
    AGU Fall meeting.

    Invited speaker: Masayuki Kano (Tohoku University)

    Slow, aseismic slip provides insight into areas of faults where
    frictional properties are conditionally stable. Yet our current
    understanding of the mechanics of slow slip transients cannot explain
    either their broad diversity, both temporal and spatial, or their
    implications for earthquake hazards. Complex interactions with tectonic
    tremor, regular earthquakes, or earthquake swarms are often observed,
    suggesting a direct, but still unclear connection between aseismic and
    seismic slip. Indirect evidence hints that high pore fluid pressures
    affect some slow slip events. While slow slip signals were observed
    before some large earthquakes, a better understanding of the mechanics
    behind aseismic transient slip events could reveal possible forecasting
    applications.

    This session welcomes: studies of aseismic transient slip observations,
    including interactions between aseismic and seismic slip behavior;
    studies of the mechanical properties or physics of aseismic transient
    slip, including modeling and laboratory work; and studies relating
    transient slip processes to seismic hazards.

    The abstract submission is open until this Wednesday, 11:59 p.m., ET.

    Sincerely,



    Lucile Bruhat (Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris)
    
Kathryn Materna (USGS Earthquake Science Center)

    Noel Bartlow (University of California Berkeley)



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