Thread: example REST webservice

Started: Oct. 11, 2005, 10:14 a.m.
Last activity: Oct. 17, 2005, 9:30 a.m.
Topics: Web Services
Joanna Muench
Oct. 11, 2005, 10:14 a.m.
While we mostly covered SOAP web services at the workshop, there are
currently more REST services available. I was at the FGIT meeting last
week (Forum for Geoscience Infrastructure) and attended a lively
discussion on SOAP vs. REST. Like so many of these things, the answer
was "it depends".

One of the participants showed me how his group is using REST within
their web site: http://www.dlese.org/dds/services/. The web site also
includes a nice JSP template with examples.

Joanna

  • Hi All -

    This looks interesting -

    SDSC Invites Developers Across a Variety of Scientific Domains to
    Access the New Online Data Management Application and Attend a
    One-Day Workshop

    Details are at
    http://www.sdsc.edu/Press/2005/10/100405_notebook.html

    Cheers - Nan

    --
    *************************************************************
    *Nan Galbraith Upper Ocean Processes Group *
    *Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02540 *
    *************************************************************


  • Hank Ratzesberger
    Oct. 13, 2005, 2:37 p.m.
    An interesting article by Tim O'Reilly discussing the
    so called "Web 2.0" says that REST fits well into the
    its lighter-weight, easier to adapt/append principles:

    Similarly, Amazon.com's web services are provided in two forms:
    one adhering to the formalisms of the SOAP (Simple Object Access
    Protocol) web services stack, the other simply providing XML data
    over HTTP, in a lightweight approach sometimes referred to as REST
    (Representational State Transfer). While high value B2B connections
    (like those between Amazon and retail partners like ToysRUs) use
    the SOAP stack, Amazon reports that 95% of the usage is of the
    lightweight REST service.

    http://www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228

    One thing about REST is you can look at them with a browser.
    This delivers the list of video streams with an
    <?xsl-stylesheet ?> instruction so that browsers render formatted
    html (but view/source and you'll see it's XML).

    --Hank

    Hank Ratzesberger
    NEES Programmer
    Institute for Crustal Studies
    University of California, Santa Barbara
    805.893.8042
    805.893.8649 (fax)

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Joanna Muench" <joanna<at>iris.washington.edu>
    To: <webservices<at>iris.washington.edu>
    Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2005 10:14 AM
    Subject: [Webservices] example REST webservice


    While we mostly covered SOAP web services at the workshop, there are
    currently more REST services available. I was at the FGIT meeting last
    week (Forum for Geoscience Infrastructure) and attended a lively
    discussion on SOAP vs. REST. Like so many of these things, the answer
    was "it depends".

    One of the participants showed me how his group is using REST within
    their web site: http://www.dlese.org/dds/services/. The web site also
    includes a nice JSP template with examples.

    Joanna
    _______________________________________________
    Webservices mailing list
    Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
    http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices

  • Hank Ratzesberger
    Oct. 13, 2005, 2:52 p.m.
    Sorry, here is the missing link:

    http://tpm.nees.ucsb.edu/feeds/


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Hank Ratzesberger" <hankr<at>crustal.ucsb.edu>
    To: "IRIS WebServices List" <webservices<at>iris.washington.edu>
    Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2005 2:37 PM
    Subject: Re: [Webservices] example REST webservice


    An interesting article by Tim O'Reilly discussing the
    so called "Web 2.0" says that REST fits well into the
    its lighter-weight, easier to adapt/append principles:

    Similarly, Amazon.com's web services are provided in two forms:
    one adhering to the formalisms of the SOAP (Simple Object Access
    Protocol) web services stack, the other simply providing XML data
    over HTTP, in a lightweight approach sometimes referred to as REST
    (Representational State Transfer). While high value B2B connections
    (like those between Amazon and retail partners like ToysRUs) use
    the SOAP stack, Amazon reports that 95% of the usage is of the
    lightweight REST service.

    http://www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228

    One thing about REST is you can look at them with a browser.
    This delivers the list of video streams with an
    <?xsl-stylesheet ?> instruction so that browsers render formatted
    html (but view/source and you'll see it's XML).

    --Hank

    Hank Ratzesberger
    NEES Programmer
    Institute for Crustal Studies
    University of California, Santa Barbara
    805.893.8042
    805.893.8649 (fax)

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Joanna Muench" <joanna<at>iris.washington.edu>
    To: <webservices<at>iris.washington.edu>
    Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2005 10:14 AM
    Subject: [Webservices] example REST webservice


    While we mostly covered SOAP web services at the workshop, there are
    currently more REST services available. I was at the FGIT meeting last
    week (Forum for Geoscience Infrastructure) and attended a lively
    discussion on SOAP vs. REST. Like so many of these things, the answer
    was "it depends".

    One of the participants showed me how his group is using REST within
    their web site: http://www.dlese.org/dds/services/. The web site also
    includes a nice JSP template with examples.

    Joanna
    _______________________________________________
    Webservices mailing list
    Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
    http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices
    _______________________________________________
    Webservices mailing list
    Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
    http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices

    • Joanna Muench
      Oct. 14, 2005, 10:51 a.m.
      Thanks for the links, Hank. Nice site and very interesting article.

      The context in which O'Reilly places web services in his "Web 2.0" list
      struck me as being very relevant to the SOAP/REST discussion. In "Web
      1.0" the most common method of programatically extracting data from an
      online source was screen scraping - manually creating an HTTP call
      (either GET or POST) and then parsing the returned HTML. Having done
      just that for a shopping comparison company (Netbot) early in the
      dot-com era, I know from experience it was a painful and fragile
      process. As soon as the merchant changed their site, even slightly, the
      script would break (strangely enough, Netbot was never profitable). REST
      is a huge improvement for such tasks.

      By such tasks, I mean querying for data using a limited number of
      variables, with the expectation of retrieving information of moderate
      complexity or size. If the desired output is in HTML, all the better (as
      long as you're okay with XSL - it makes some people I know break out in
      hives). But, like everything in IT, there is no one solution to all
      problems. For instance, if you want to ingest the XML into Java objects,
      you may need a schema to create the object bindings, at which point
      you're half-way to SOAP. Need to stream lots of data - you probably
      don't want to be operating in the web services sphere at all.

      The challenge (and the fun) of working in IT is coming up with as light
      weight a solution to a problem as is feasible. Just about as light
      weight as they come, REST is the most appropriate technology for many
      problems. And it beats screen-scraping hands down!

      Any other REST services out there? Or services that considered REST but
      ended up with SOAP?

      Joanna Muench


      Hank Ratzesberger wrote:
      Sorry, here is the missing link:

      http://tpm.nees.ucsb.edu/feeds/


      ----- Original Message ----- From: "Hank Ratzesberger"
      <hankr<at>crustal.ucsb.edu>
      To: "IRIS WebServices List" <webservices<at>iris.washington.edu>
      Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2005 2:37 PM
      Subject: Re: [Webservices] example REST webservice


      An interesting article by Tim O'Reilly discussing the so called "Web
      2.0" says that REST fits well into the its lighter-weight, easier to
      adapt/append principles:
      Similarly, Amazon.com's web services are provided in two forms: one
      adhering to the formalisms of the SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol)
      web services stack, the other simply providing XML data over HTTP, in
      a lightweight approach sometimes referred to as REST (Representational
      State Transfer). While high value B2B connections (like those between
      Amazon and retail partners like ToysRUs) use the SOAP stack, Amazon
      reports that 95% of the usage is of the lightweight REST service.

      http://www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228

      One thing about REST is you can look at them with a browser. This
      delivers the list of video streams with an <?xsl-stylesheet ?>
      instruction so that browsers render formatted
      html (but view/source and you'll see it's XML).

      --Hank

      Hank Ratzesberger
      NEES Programmer
      Institute for Crustal Studies
      University of California, Santa Barbara
      805.893.8042
      805.893.8649 (fax)

      ----- Original Message ----- From: "Joanna Muench"
      <joanna<at>iris.washington.edu>
      To: <webservices<at>iris.washington.edu>
      Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2005 10:14 AM
      Subject: [Webservices] example REST webservice


      While we mostly covered SOAP web services at the workshop, there are
      currently more REST services available. I was at the FGIT meeting
      last week (Forum for Geoscience Infrastructure) and attended a lively
      discussion on SOAP vs. REST. Like so many of these things, the answer
      was "it depends".

      One of the participants showed me how his group is using REST within
      their web site: http://www.dlese.org/dds/services/. The web site also
      includes a nice JSP template with examples.

      Joanna
      _______________________________________________
      Webservices mailing list
      Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
      http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices

      _______________________________________________
      Webservices mailing list
      Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
      http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices

      _______________________________________________
      Webservices mailing list
      Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
      http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices

  • Marlon Pierce
    Oct. 15, 2005, 1:08 p.m.
    I think its more appropriate to compare REST to the W3C's Web Service
    Architecture than to SOAP: http://www.w3.org/TR/ws-arch/.

    Marlon

    Joanna Muench wrote:

    While we mostly covered SOAP web services at the workshop, there are
    currently more REST services available. I was at the FGIT meeting last
    week (Forum for Geoscience Infrastructure) and attended a lively
    discussion on SOAP vs. REST. Like so many of these things, the answer
    was "it depends".

    One of the participants showed me how his group is using REST within
    their web site: http://www.dlese.org/dds/services/. The web site also
    includes a nice JSP template with examples.

    Joanna
    _______________________________________________
    Webservices mailing list
    Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
    http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices



  • Hank Ratzesberger
    Oct. 17, 2005, 9:30 a.m.
    Thanks, I was piping in to say that I am on the list and
    continue to be interested in all that develops.

    I am familiar with the HTML screen scraping methods (with
    things like the Perl HTMLParser) and I agree that the
    so called REST style is much better.

    XSL is indeed complicated because it is declarative and
    uses recursion, but along with XQuery, is powerful
    and extensible.

    One thing I was hinting at, is that a REST style repository
    could be accessible from either a browser or a service. Indeed
    with an xml-stylesheet instruction on every resource, it
    is the same site.

    I think a key issue is whether your architecture is built
    around Java or C++ (objects) or XML, and similarly, if you
    are trying to create specialized/synchronized services or if
    you are trying to publish a repository. I hope to have a more
    complete example of the latter in the next couple months.

    Cheers,
    Hank

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Joanna Muench" <joanna<at>iris.washington.edu>
    To: "IRIS WebServices List" <webservices<at>iris.washington.edu>
    Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 10:51 AM
    Subject: Re: [Webservices] example REST webservice


    Thanks for the links, Hank. Nice site and very interesting article.

    The context in which O'Reilly places web services in his "Web 2.0" list
    struck me as being very relevant to the SOAP/REST discussion. In "Web
    1.0" the most common method of programatically extracting data from an
    online source was screen scraping - manually creating an HTTP call
    (either GET or POST) and then parsing the returned HTML. Having done
    just that for a shopping comparison company (Netbot) early in the
    dot-com era, I know from experience it was a painful and fragile
    process. As soon as the merchant changed their site, even slightly, the
    script would break (strangely enough, Netbot was never profitable). REST
    is a huge improvement for such tasks.

    By such tasks, I mean querying for data using a limited number of
    variables, with the expectation of retrieving information of moderate
    complexity or size. If the desired output is in HTML, all the better (as
    long as you're okay with XSL - it makes some people I know break out in
    hives). But, like everything in IT, there is no one solution to all
    problems. For instance, if you want to ingest the XML into Java objects,
    you may need a schema to create the object bindings, at which point
    you're half-way to SOAP. Need to stream lots of data - you probably
    don't want to be operating in the web services sphere at all.

    The challenge (and the fun) of working in IT is coming up with as light
    weight a solution to a problem as is feasible. Just about as light
    weight as they come, REST is the most appropriate technology for many
    problems. And it beats screen-scraping hands down!

    Any other REST services out there? Or services that considered REST but
    ended up with SOAP?

    Joanna Muench


    Hank Ratzesberger wrote:
    Sorry, here is the missing link:

    http://tpm.nees.ucsb.edu/feeds/


    ----- Original Message ----- From: "Hank Ratzesberger"
    <hankr<at>crustal.ucsb.edu>
    To: "IRIS WebServices List" <webservices<at>iris.washington.edu>
    Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2005 2:37 PM
    Subject: Re: [Webservices] example REST webservice


    An interesting article by Tim O'Reilly discussing the so called "Web
    2.0" says that REST fits well into the its lighter-weight, easier to
    adapt/append principles:
    Similarly, Amazon.com's web services are provided in two forms: one
    adhering to the formalisms of the SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol)
    web services stack, the other simply providing XML data over HTTP, in
    a lightweight approach sometimes referred to as REST (Representational
    State Transfer). While high value B2B connections (like those between
    Amazon and retail partners like ToysRUs) use the SOAP stack, Amazon
    reports that 95% of the usage is of the lightweight REST service.

    http://www.oreillynet.com/lpt/a/6228

    One thing about REST is you can look at them with a browser. This
    delivers the list of video streams with an <?xsl-stylesheet ?>
    instruction so that browsers render formatted
    html (but view/source and you'll see it's XML).

    --Hank

    Hank Ratzesberger
    NEES Programmer
    Institute for Crustal Studies
    University of California, Santa Barbara
    805.893.8042
    805.893.8649 (fax)

    ----- Original Message ----- From: "Joanna Muench"
    <joanna<at>iris.washington.edu>
    To: <webservices<at>iris.washington.edu>
    Sent: Tuesday, October 11, 2005 10:14 AM
    Subject: [Webservices] example REST webservice


    While we mostly covered SOAP web services at the workshop, there are
    currently more REST services available. I was at the FGIT meeting
    last week (Forum for Geoscience Infrastructure) and attended a lively
    discussion on SOAP vs. REST. Like so many of these things, the answer
    was "it depends".

    One of the participants showed me how his group is using REST within
    their web site: http://www.dlese.org/dds/services/. The web site also
    includes a nice JSP template with examples.

    Joanna
    _______________________________________________
    Webservices mailing list
    Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
    http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices

    _______________________________________________
    Webservices mailing list
    Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
    http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices

    _______________________________________________
    Webservices mailing list
    Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
    http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices
    _______________________________________________
    Webservices mailing list
    Webservices<at>iris.washington.edu
    http://www.iris.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/webservices