Thread: IRIS Seismology Webinar - Under the Sea: Ocean Bottom Seismology for Landlubbers

Started: 2013-03-08 22:43:46
Last activity: 2013-03-19 16:08:36
Topics: Early Careers
The next IRIS-sponsored webinar will present "Under the Sea: Ocean
Bottom Seismology for Landlubbers" on Wednesday March 13, 2013 from 3-4
pm EDT.

Register to attend, here:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/283212282. You will then receive a
confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. The
presentation and subsequent Q&A session with the speaker will be
recorded and available for viewing within a few days. More information
on IRIS webinars, including links to previously recorded presentations
and related materials, may be found here: http://www.iris.edu/hq/webinar/

Presenter: Dr. Doug Wiens, Washington University in St. Louis -
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Summary: Seismological instrumentation has traditionally been restricted
to the 30% of the Earth’s surface that lies above sea level.
Technological advances over the last several decades now allow retrieval
of passive seismic data from the seafloor using ocean bottom
seismographs (OBS). However, the ocean bottom environment presents
additional challenges for seismic data collection and analysis,
including limitations on recording duration, different noise
characteristics, siting and instrument orientation issues, and timing
uncertainties.

In this webinar, I will briefly describe OBS instrumentation and discuss
how we attempt to mitigate some of the difficulties in collecting high
quality passive seismic data in the oceans. I will describe the basic
steps needed to design, propose and carry out an OBS deployment using
the US National OBS Instrumentation Pool, now managed by IRIS with NSF
funding. The application of traditional seismic analysis methods, such
as surface and body wave tomography, noise correlation, receiver
functions, and shear wave splitting to OBS data will be discussed.
Finally I will close by showing results from ocean bottom seismograph
experiments for several different environments, including mid-ocean
ridges, transform faults, and subduction zones.

You may contact Andy Frassetto (andyf<at>iris.edu) with any related inquiries.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, 8, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Macintosh®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

  • The next IRIS/EarthScope Transportable Array sponsored webinar will
    present "Body-wave seismic interferometry - Data mining from distant
    seismicity" on Thursday, March 28 2013 from 2:30-3:30 pm EDT.

    Register to attend, here:
    https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/237576922. You will then receive a
    confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. The
    presentation and subsequent Q&A session with the speaker will be
    recorded and available for viewing within a few days. More information
    on IRIS webinars, including links to previously recorded presentations
    and related materials, may be found here: http://www.iris.edu/hq/webinar/

    Presenter: Dr. Elmer Ruigrok, Delft University of Technology

    With the near completion of the contiguous USArray, a rich dataset is
    becoming available to image a large part of the North American continent
    in 3D. The seismic-receiver distribution is excellent for deep
    reflection imaging. However, the biased distribution of nearby
    seismicity prevents a straightforward application. Instead, distant
    seismicity can be used together with body-wave seismic interferometry.
    With seismic interferometry, reflections are extracted from the
    reverberations in transmission responses. This allows the creation of
    reflection responses as if there were large seismic sources at the
    positions of the USArray stations. The extracted reflections can be
    further processed into sharp reflectivity images.

    In this presentation, we explain the basics of body-wave seismic
    interferometry. Using data from several arrays around the world, we give
    examples of field applications on global and lithospheric scale. The
    application of body-wave seismic interferometry to USArray data is still
    in its infancy. Yet, we will show recent progress and a possible way
    forward.

    You may contact Andy Frassetto (andyf<at>iris.edu) with any related inquiries.

    System Requirements
    PC-based attendees
    Required: Windows® 7, 8, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
    Macintosh®-based attendees
    Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

12:02:08 v.b1cd4f60