Thread: Server Testing

Started: 2016-11-19 04:59:48
Last activity: 2016-11-19 07:19:36
Topics: Web Services
kanchan aggarwal
2016-11-19 04:59:48
Hi,

I want to know how to do server testing using "Slinktool".

Thanks,
Kanchan Aggarwal
  • Chad Trabant
    2016-11-19 05:09:41

    Hi Kanchan Aggarwal,

    Can you describe in a bit more detail what you are intending to do?

    slinktool is a program for accessing a SeedLink server. You can use it to query the status of a server, which streams are available, current connections, etc. The current code is here:

    https://github.com/iris-edu/slinktool

    along with the user manual including examples:

    https://github.com/iris-edu/slinktool/blob/master/doc/slinktool.md

    regards,
    Chad


    On Nov 18, 2016, at 8:59 PM, kanchan aggarwal <kanchanagg08<at>gmail.com> wrote:

    Hi,

    I want to know how to do server testing using "Slinktool".

    Thanks,
    Kanchan Aggarwal

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    • kanchan aggarwal
      2016-11-19 06:03:13
      Hi,

      I actually want to test whether the bandwidth of my workstation is large enough to download real time data from the server. Since Slinktool is used for server testing I thought I can use this tool for the same.

      Thanks
      • Chad Trabant
        2016-11-19 07:19:36
        Hi,

        You can definitely use slinktool for that kind of testing. Depending on the server implementation you have different options for selecting data. With the IRIS ringserver you can use wildcards when selecting networks and stations. For example, using the IRIS DMC's SeedLink server you can request all of the TA network data using this command:

        $ slinktool rtserve.iris.washington.edu -S 'TA_*' -p

        The -p option means that slinktool will print a line for each packet received and it will include a latency value that you can watch to determine if data latency is increasing.

        Keep in mind that receiving the data over the network is only testing the network bandwidth. In some cases, in particular with older hardware, the hard disk can be the limiting factor. If you want to write the data to your storage system you'll need to add the -o <file> option as well.

        For most modern computing systems, common seismic data streams are easily handled. For example, the combined total of all data streams flowing out of the IRIS DMC's SeedLink service (30,000+ channels) is nominally 1.3 megabytes/second. Most systems nowadays, even a Raspberry PI, can handle receiving that. Of course, the situation changes if you want to decompress and process all of that data on-the-fly.

        regards,
        Chad


        On Nov 18, 2016, at 10:03 PM, kanchan aggarwal <kanchanagg08<at>gmail.com> wrote:

        Hi,

        I actually want to test whether the bandwidth of my workstation is large enough to download real time data from the server. Since Slinktool is used for server testing I thought I can use this tool for the same.

        Thanks


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