Thread: IRIS WEBINAR: The use of nuclear magnetic resonance for understanding groundwater resources, 1/28 at 2 PM Eastern

Started: 2021-01-22 16:00:00
Last activity: 2021-01-22 16:35:47
Topics: Webinars
After the exciting webinar and panel on '*Best Practices for Seismic
Posthole Emplacement*', please take a 1-hr break, and join us for an
exciting webinar!

Please join us on *Thursday, January 28th* at* 2:00 PM Eastern *for...

*The use of nuclear magnetic resonance for understanding groundwater
resources*

*Presented by:* Dr. Kristina Keating, Rutgers University -
Newark, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

*Abstract:* Geophysical methods can provide a non-invasive method for
estimating spatial variability in hydrogeological parameters such as water
content, hydraulic conductivity, and matric potential. Proton nuclear
magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique amongst geophysical methods in that it
is directly sensitive to water, via the initial signal magnitude, and thus
provides a robust estimate of water content. In addition, the NMR
relaxation time is sensitive to pore geometry, allowing it to be used to
predict the hydraulic conductivity and to determine water retention curves.
While NMR measurements are considered a mature technology in the petroleum
industry, the strength of NMR data for hydrogeophysical studies is still
being realized. The major ongoing challenge is to generate a functional
mapping of the relationship between pore geometry and relaxation time that
is appropriate for near surface geologic materials, while accounting for
pore chemistry. Here I will present examples from the laboratory and the
field that highlight our recent successes in using NMR measurements to
estimate several hydrogeological parameters and overcome the limitations of
standard petrophysical models.

All IRIS webinars are archived for later viewing at
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD4D607C2FA317E6D

Any questions? Contact us at webinar<at>iris.edu

  • Sorry for the multiple emails! With the Zoom information...

    After the exciting webinar and panel on '*Best Practices for Seismic
    Posthole Emplacement*', please take a 1-hr break, and join us for an
    exciting webinar!

    Please join us on *Thursday, January 28th* at* 2:00 PM Eastern *for...

    *The use of nuclear magnetic resonance for understanding groundwater
    resources*

    *Presented by:* Dr. Kristina Keating, Rutgers University -
    Newark, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Please click the link below to join the webinar:

    https://zoom.us/j/98604315891?pwd=amJjbUtYM2E3RmZVUkR4WHZyME5uZz09
    Passcode: 035563
    Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +12532158782,,98604315891# or +13462487799,,98604315891#
    Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
    US: +1 253 215 8782 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 669 900 6833 or +1
    301 715 8592 or +1 312 626 6799 or +1 929 205 6099
    Webinar ID: 986 0431 5891
    International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/ad8w9s3ONa

    *Abstract:* Geophysical methods can provide a non-invasive method for
    estimating spatial variability in hydrogeological parameters such as water
    content, hydraulic conductivity, and matric potential. Proton nuclear
    magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique amongst geophysical methods in that it
    is directly sensitive to water, via the initial signal magnitude, and thus
    provides a robust estimate of water content. In addition, the NMR
    relaxation time is sensitive to pore geometry, allowing it to be used to
    predict the hydraulic conductivity and to determine water retention curves.
    While NMR measurements are considered a mature technology in the petroleum
    industry, the strength of NMR data for hydrogeophysical studies is still
    being realized. The major ongoing challenge is to generate a functional
    mapping of the relationship between pore geometry and relaxation time that
    is appropriate for near surface geologic materials, while accounting for
    pore chemistry. Here I will present examples from the laboratory and the
    field that highlight our recent successes in using NMR measurements to
    estimate several hydrogeological parameters and overcome the limitations of
    standard petrophysical models.

    All IRIS webinars are archived for later viewing at
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD4D607C2FA317E6D

    Any questions? Contact us at webinar<at>iris.edu

05:10:47 v.22510d55