Thread: Neither elastic nor harmonic: the Earth’s transient behavior across time/length-scales (2021 AGU Fall Meeting Session DI013)

Started: 2021-07-18 16:56:33
Last activity: 2021-07-18 16:56:33
Topics: AGU Meetings
Dear Colleagues,

If your research involves rheology, connecting mantle deformation to rock mechanics, seismology, and geodesy, and the grand suite of intriguing processes that fall between the “plastic” and “elastic” regimes, this may be an AGU session invitation you don’t want to immediately delete…

We invite you to submit an abstract to our session "Neither elastic nor harmonic: the Earth’s transient behavior across time/length-scales" (DI013) at this year's AGU Fall Meeting <https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm21/prelim.cgi/Session/122141 (13–17th December 2021, hybrid between New Orleans & online)
https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm21/prelim.cgi/Session/122141

Description:
In contrast to the simplifying assumptions made in several geoscience fields, rocks at depth do not behave purely elastically (high-frequency seismology) nor viscously (long-timescale geodesy and dynamical modelling). In fact, Earth’s mechanical response to stress is a combination of these two end-member behaviors with a third: a time-varying transient response that is essential for accurately capturing phenomena on timescales from 10^-1 to 10^12 s, including seismic attenuation, earthquake afterslip, solid-Earth tides, and post-glacial rebound. Only by combining geophysical observations, laboratory observations and theoretical frameworks that span broad time/length-scales can we identify constitutive relationships that explain and predict Earth’s broadband behavior. We invite contributions from the seismology, geodesy, rock mechanics, and geodynamics communities to evaluate and assimilate recent progress on understanding Earth’s transient mechanics.

Invited Speakers:
- Harriet Lau (UC Berkeley) will discuss the theoretical development of broad spectrum rheology that folds in geodetic and seismic constraints
- David Wallis (University of Cambridge) will discuss how a new generation of microphysical models inform our understanding of deformation processes

We look forward to seeing you (by Zoom or in the Room) in New Orleans.

Best regards,

Zach Eilon
Colleen Dalton
Kristel Chanard
Lars Hansen
Ming Hao


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